Eight top tips to help you through the menopause

Eight top tips to help you through the menopause

From dealing with hot flushes to keeping a diary, we share valuable advice for getting you through this potentially turbulent time

From dealing with hot flushes to keeping a diary, we share valuable advice for getting you through this potentially turbulent time

You’d think us women have had enough to deal with in life ¬– from periods to labour to stiletto heels – but our fifties usually bring with them the joy that is the menopause.

All joking aside, the menopause can be a real struggle as our changing hormones play havoc with our bodies and emotions.

Indeed, our celebrity editor and ‘Menopausal Mumma’ Carol Vorderman recently admitted on ITV’s Lorraine that she suffered with depression when she went through the menopause.

If you’re struggling with the symptoms too, pay a visit to your doctor. There’s medication to help with everything from hot flushes to mental health struggles, so don’t be afraid seek the help you need.

In addition, you can read on for our tips on how to help make the process as bearable as possible.

1. Prioritise your sleep

You’ll probably find that the menopause will disturb your sleep patterns – from insomnia to waking up in a hot-flush-induced pool of sweat.

To help with getting off to sleep, introduce a bedtime routine – a bath, a cup of warm milk and reading a few chapters of your book, for example. This will help tell your body that it’s time to wind down and prepare for sleep.

To make hot flushes in the night more bearable, ensure the bedroom is cool and well ventilated via an open window or fan.

Wear light cotton pyjamas and layer your bed with a thin sheet so you can kick off your duvet when you’re hot but still stay cosy.

For more suggestions, read our Top tips for a great night’s sleep.

2. Switch your skincare

You might notice your skin changes through the menopause, becoming more sensitive and prone to dryness.

Adjust your beauty routine accordingly, looking for rich but oil-free lotions and a higher SPF protection as your skin becomes more sensitive to the sun.

Also look to swap your regular detergent for Fairy Non-Bio, which is voted as the number one laundry brand for sensitive skin, leaving you free of irritation. Well, from your clothes, anyway…

3. Warn your family!

Your moods will take you on a rollercoaster ride during the menopause – it’s like a cranked-up PMS ¬– fun!

Although you’re the one having to deal with all these fluctuating emotions, your nearest and dearest will probably notice it too.

So let them know that you’re feeling more sensitive than usual because of the menopause. This way they can make allowances when you snap at them quicker or burst into tears because you’ve run out of milk.

Hopefully they’ll also make an extra effort to look after you and make sure you’re happy and comfortable while you go through this tricky time.

4. Keep a symptom diary

We all know the menopause causes hot flushes, but certain things might trigger one for you. Caffeine, spicy food, smoking and alcohol, for example, are common triggers.

Every time you suffer with a hot flush, think about what you’ve eaten, or what activity you’ve just done and make a note of it in a diary. Start looking for patterns and, if you find that something appears to be triggering your hot flushes, it’s best to avoid it.

You might also find you suffer with more headaches than usual, or even migraines. Again, when this happens, make a note in your diary of what might have caused it and seek to avoid it in future.

5. Always be prepared

A hot flush can grip you anywhere at any time, so you need to be prepared.

Wear layers so you can quickly remove items of clothing when you’re having a flush. Also, focus on your breathing. Take slow, deep breaths from your abdomen until it passes.

Another symptom of the menopause is a more sensitive bladder, so also remember to wear Always Discreet to help eliminate wetness and odours from any impromptu leaks.

6. Talk to your friends

You are not alone when going through the menopause, though it can often feel like it. Don’t be afraid to open up to your friends about how you’re feeling – you’ll probably discover they’re going through the same thing and you can even laugh (or cry) about it together.

You could also try an online forum, where the support you receive and stories shared will make you realise you are not the only one struggling through this time of life.

7. Learn a new hobby

You can be more forgetful and get ‘fuggy brain’ more often when you’re going through the menopause.

Keep your mind active and brain ticking by reading, doing crosswords and Sudoku and even learning a new skill, perhaps by attending a dance class or language course.

Think of something you have always wanted to try but haven’t yet had the time to. And if you think you still don’t have the time, check out our Five ways to make more time for your hobbies.

8. Exercise and eat well

Hopefully you’ll be doing this anyway as exercise and a good diet are important for, well, pretty much everything.

But do double check you’re getting all the right nutrients in a diet that’s rich in fruit and veg.

Exercise is also great for making you feel good and releasing those all-important endorphins. Brisk walks are a good way to get your heart going, fresh air, and it’s good for your overall mental health and wellbeing.

Yoga, too, is another great choice. While you’re doing all that bending and stretching, you need to focus on your breath, which helps quiet the mind and lower your stress levels.

Feeling inspired? Check out our Five-pose morning yoga routine.

Are you going through the menopause? Let us know how you’re coping and do share any tips you think may help others in the comments section below.

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Worth a try

Zelda 27/10/2017

Wellsprings serenity natural cream is worth a try.Once it's in your system there is a big difference in symptoms. I also found that the awful pain I was suffering in joints and limbs was due to my vitamin D being depleted . My doctor sent me for a blood test to check as bone pain and fatigue are side effects of low vitamin D. The difference taking this supplement is remarkable.

Soya for hot flushes

Suzanne 24/08/2017

I have been drinking soya milk in my morning coffee and taking it on my cereal for about 2 years now. The minute I stop, like recently when I was on holiday, the hot flushes and sweats start. It took about 10 days of having soya back in my system for the flushes to stop. I swear by soya.

Natural menopause solution

Clare 20/08/2017

I have just started taking 'Menopause Support' by A.Vogal. A natural source, as tried conventional pills, they didn't work. It's really effective. Also good to have your Thyroid checked as can be a link. Then again 'Thyroid Support', completely natural by Cytoplan. A good diet with lots of fruit and salads etc, loads of water has helped too. Reading good blogs, e.g Mrs Menopause, it makes you laugh as well as very informative. Hope this helps ☺

Menopause

Princess68 31/07/2017

I have started having hot flushes in the last 18 months, my practise nurse suggested Black Cohosh and St John's Wort. Managing to sleep most of the night with a fan in the bedroom. Cant have HRT as family history of cancer.

Hot Flushes

Rachel 21/07/2017

I started early menopause, following life saving emergency surgery and have had little to no support or help from my GP. No one can prepare you for the awful hot flushes. Almost as soon as I am in bed I feel the heat! It starts just below the rib cage and rapidly hits everything above. Within minutes the sweat is just dripping off me. The GP refuses to give me HRT due to "female cancers" in my family, despite those 'affected' being told the particular types are NOT related. HELP!

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