Think denim is for kids? Think again

Think denim is for kids? Think again

Tamsin Blanchard celebrates enduring style with a hint of rebellion – tough, iconic, versatile denim. Plus she shows you how to rock it at any age.

To paraphrase the late great Coco Chanel, denim is eternal. Not that she would have been caught dead in a pair of jeans. But I’m sure we all remember, back in the ’80s, how great a pair of Levi’s looked with a Chanel jacket.

Was it Ines de la Fressange I’m thinking of? Or Claudia Schiffer? Either way, the thing about jeans is they add a touch of reality. And if you wear them right, an easy dose of cool to any outfit.

Style with spirit

Demin jeans are ageless, timeless and classless. And while I try to ignore my daughter’s suggestion that I invest in a pair of ‘mom’ jeans, they still make me feel like a rebel without a cause.

How to wear it

Now I’m not about to pretend that I still have fantasies of looking like Olivia Newton John, lying on the floor to ease the zip up on a pair of skin tight stretch skinnies (tell me more, tell me more!) – the way jeans are cut and fit has changed a lot since those days.

While I spent most of my twenties with a pair of badly fitting men’s 501s belted round my waist, these days it’s possible to find jeans that fit like a glove, hugging your bum, pulling in your tummy, fitting your waist, and making your legs look three inches longer in the process.

Yes, you can get denim shapewear. Levi’s Curve ID offers three different cuts that claim to flatter any figure.

Alternatively, Spanx do denim leggings… but I’m not sure I want to go there with that.

What to buy

Whatever your shape, it’s worth looking beyond your denim comfort zone.

Forget the brand you grew up with and try on some different styles. You don’t have to spend a fortune, though you easily can.

Gap and Uniqlo have some really great Japanese indigo denim. And if you want to just try out what’s new, or experiment with some new shapes, Selfridges Denim Studio is the place to go for something high-waisted, dip-dyed and raw-edged. Though not, of course, necessarily all on the same jeans.

What’s on trend

The biggest trend in denim right now is ripped and shredded – with asymmetric hems. If you feel confident looking like a lawnmower ate your jeans, then go for it. If not, try something a little more restrained.

I’m a big fan of remade denim, which is another big trend right now. There are some interesting brands who are upcycling old jeans in clever ways.

LA brand Re/Done Denim have unpicked waist bands from jeans to make a No Waist relaxed jean (don’t try this if your stomach isn’t washboard flat). Their Leandra jean was made for the brilliant blogger Leandra Medine, who you might know as Man Repeller. It was made to her specifications – a cropped high waist men’s Levi jean with a triangle of denim added to make a kicky flare at the bottom. Very flattering.

Dare I say it, if you are handy with a sewing machine, why not try playing around with your old jeans or some charity shop finds to make your perfect pair? The rougher they look, they better. And they won’t come with a price tag that will make your hems curl.


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Back to flower power

05/10/2016

I think I am going to put some floral panels in the calf side of my jeans then some patches under the ripped parts. Gets a bit chilly when you are 60 to have holes in your jeans,

Interesting

04/10/2016

Interesting article, nice idea to give a new life to old jeans

freebies

carol 08/09/2016

Cant wait to receive my freebies

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